Engagement, Photo

Engaged | Kathleen & William

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The very first thought I had when Kathleen and William sent news that they were engaged was, “Oh gosh, I hope I get to do their engagements.” And I did! So grateful to be able to take pictures of such lovely, thoughtful friends. One of the locations we went to was the spot of William’s proposal and their first date. As we walked toward the bridge where a couple of years ago they graffitied their favorite words, Kathleen recalled how their hands had accidentally brushed against each other, and she nervously darted ahead because she didn’t want to hold hands yet. Such an endearing little anecdote, especially after catching her, at the end of the evening, holding her left hand out in front of her and admiring her ring. It was a tender moment made especially funny when she realized that I caught her looking at it! But it’s a ring well worth admiring. Designed by William and made by Kathleen’s great uncle, it’s a beautiful reminder of the word William wrote on that bridge: “Always.”

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Congratulations, William & Kathleen!

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Southern Primavera

The cicada cries out and the air breaks into a sweat. The after-rain spreads the magnolia’s perfume. Hollow exoskeletons cling to branches where the fire-eyed insects were reborn out of their old skin. White petals unfold, big and open-mouthed—an invitation to come closer, to listen to the cicadas pulsing in the black of the tree’s leathery leaves way up, to lean in and smell the flower’s shell. Steam rises up from the ground. Everything is saturated. Everything is in bloom.

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Wash Over Me

Last summer I visited the beach and later went canoeing on the Buffalo River. Reflecting on the past year, I think these trips were extremely calming for me during a time in which I was in need of some perspective and peace. Something about the vast formlessness of the ocean and the directional sweeping of the river kind of carried me away, and I’ve been thinking about water imagery fairly regularly since. We wash ourselves with water. It makes us feel clean and fresh. But it also breaks things down and smoothes them over, like stones at the bottom of a riverbed or the walls of a canyon deepening over time. It immerses, recedes, and then a new thing emerges. It simultaneously alters and restores. With that said, I am pleased to share this film swap with my good friend Rebecca. I had been itching to do something fun with film again, and I’m so glad to have had her help with this experiment. I shot a few rolls of portraits in a studio with the assistance of Rebecca, who then took the film home with her to San Diego where she exposed the rolls again at the beach.

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